♣ No. IV ~ Saturn Devouring his Son

One of my favorite sections on the blog – I get to rant about my favorite form of art. How great is that? Rhetorical question.

I’m sure lots of you have heard of Peter Paul Rubens.

Peter Paul Rubens (1577 – 1640)
[Dutch Artist]

Rubens was born on June 28, 1577. He was one of many famous Flemish Baroque painter – an art produced in Southern Netherlands between 1585, when the Dutch Republic split from the Habsburg Spain regions to the south by the recapturing of Antwerp (a city and municipality in Belgium) by the Spanish, until 1700, when Habsburg authority ended with the death of King Charles II.

He was also a proponent of an extravagant Baroque style that emphasized movement, color, and sensuality. In addition to that, he was well known for his Counter-Reformation altarpieces, landscapes, portraits, and history paintings of mythological and allegorical subjects.

Rubens had, as well, a strong influence on seventeenth-century visual culture. His innovations helped define Antwerp as one of Europe‘s major artistic cities. He was also a classically educated humanist scholar, art collector, and diplomat who was knighted by both Philip IV, King of Spain, and Charles I, King of England.

Saturn Devouring his Son – Peter Paul Rubens

Title: Saturn Devouring his Son [Saturno devorando a su hijo]
By: Peter Paul Rubens (1577 – 1640)
Original Size: 87 x 180 cm / 34.3 x 70.9 inches
Medium: Oil On Canvas
Location: Prado, Madrid, Spain
Photo Credit: Bridgeman Art Library
Image ID: XIR36857
Year: 1636

This painting was firstly portrayed by Francisco de Goya, the Spanish artist who gave the painting its current name. The whole idea of the painting was inspired by the Greek myth of one of the Titans – Cronus (Romanized to: “Saturn“). He ate each one of his children upon birth because he was afraid that they might be able to turn on him (that he might be overthrown by them).

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~ by Núr on August 13, 2012.

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